Introduction

This site will be the focal point for some of the best SSTV images received during Oct 2008 and beyond. Images will be downlinked by ISS on 145.800 MHz. To view some of the received images transmitted from the ISS check out the following Gallery Website . You may also submit images at that website as well.



In addition to SSTV image receptions, reports of planned amateur radio activity using SSTV will be provided.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

April 11-14 SSTV event to highlight human spaceflight

April 6, 2019:

ARISS Russia is planning Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmissions from the International Space Station. The transmissions begin Thursday, April 11, 2019 around 18:00 UTC and run continuously until approximately 18:00 UTC on Sunday, April 14, 2019. This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver. Once these images are received by ham radio operators and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, many participants will post them for viewing at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ . The transmissions will be broadcast at 145.800 MHz using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time.

Thursday, March 21, 2019

April 2019 SSTV planning

Preliminary scheduling shows ISS SSTV likely around April 12 (Cosmonautics day/Yuri's Night). More details later once the official schedule is released in another week or so.

** UPDATE - March 23**
In addition to the worldwide event listed above, MAI-75 will be planning SSTV transmissions for a few orbits of ISS that are in range of Moscow. Times are roughly from 14:00-19:00 UTC on April 1 and 2.

**UPDATE - April 3**
The MAI-75 activity was a success with ground stations mainly in Europe, Asia, Australia and South America posting received copy of images. All 12 images were eventually posted to the gallery.

The next big event will be the ARISS SSTV event that starts Thursday, April 11 about 18:00 UTC and will be operational until about 18:00 UTC on Sunday, April 14. Since this event will run continuously for 72 hours, folks in the higher latitudes should have a pretty good chance to receive all 12 of the images. Operators in the mid latitudes should be able to get most of them depending on location. Good Luck and Enjoy!

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Bonus opportunity Feb 15-17


The ARISS team expects that a second SSTV transmission event will occur from ISS this weekend.

ARISS Russia team member Sergey Samburov, RV3DR, worked with the mission control center flight controllers to schedule in ISS crew member time to configure the JVC Kenwood radio to support SSTV operations in the Service Module.  SSTV setup is expected to start around 8:45 UTC on February 15 and conclude around 17:25 UTC on February 17.  These dates/times are expectations and may vary.

The ARISS team wanted to give the community another opportunity to downlink the SSTV images we developed for you given the weak signal situation that occurred last weekend.  For clarity, these will be the same 12 images that were downlinked last weekend.

As a reminder, you can get the latest SSTV information on the ARISS SSTV Blog Spot:  http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/  Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php   And you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. See https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/.  For simplicity, we have added a new tab for SSTV, under general contacts, on the ARISS web site www.ariss.org

For those that are asking, we are still not totally clear what caused the issue last weekend.  We believe it may have been either a loose feedline cable or an antenna switch that did not fully engage. Once the crew reset the system and checked the cabling and switches, the radio system started to perform nominally.

Enjoy!!

73,  Frank, KA3HDO
-------------------

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Feb ARISS SSTV recap

The first 24 hours or so had very low signal strength from ISS. Crew was asked to check the setup and nothing appeared out of the ordinary. A reboot of the system yielded no change. The next day the crew member rechecked all the connections and feed lines. Somewhere in that process the signal returned to normal levels. Below is a link to DK3WN's website where he has examples of all 12 images that were sent from the ISS. http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?p=93285

All 12 images captured by DK3WN

Monday, February 4, 2019

Announcing ARISS/NOTA Slow Scan TV Event



Feb 2, 2019:

ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 18:25 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC. SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram. 

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.80 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band. After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed. 

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA)
images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included.

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ .


Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org websites, the AMSAT-BB@amsat.org, the ARISS facebook at Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) and ARISS twitter @ARISS_status.


About ARISS
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.



Feb 4 Update***
Setup and activation is now 14:00 UTC.

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

INTER-MAI-75 Jan. image examples from ground stations

Below are examples of the 12 different images that were received by amateur radio operators around the world on Jan 30.  The experiment is scheduled to operate on Jan 31 and Feb 1 as well.

PU4JOE
IW2AGJ
G0IIQ

SV2CPH
TA5ABO
VU3YFD
SP8CGR
LU4EOU
BD4UJ
PW8PM
9Z4DZ
PR8KW

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Inter-MAI activation scheduled for Jan 30 - Feb 1

Received information that the Moscow Aviation Institute will be conducting their SSTV experiment from January 30 - February 1. It appears from the scheduling that the experiment will only be active during a couple of orbits that overfly Moscow instead of a continuous operation. Rough time periods of activation appear to fall between the hours of 13:00 - 19:00 UTC. Activity should occur on the traditional 145.800 MHz downlink.

Update Jan 29***

Daily schedule.
Jan 30 - 13:30 UTC - setup and activation
Jan 30 - 18:30 UTC - shutdown

Jan 31 - 13:20 UTC - activation
Jan 31 - 17:40 UTC - shutdown

Feb 1 - 13:45 UTC - activation
Feb 1 - 16:45 UTC - shutdown and stow